Mar 26
Flying squirrels in Jonesborough Tn.
26 Mar, 2016. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
We recently received a Flying Squirrel call in Jonesborough Tn. from Stacy Browning.  Mr. Browning had opened up the access to the attic and there, sitting at the top of the fold down stairs, were a couple of flying squirrels looking back.  After some research, Mr. Browning realized that he could have a large colony of squirrels in his attic.   Although he liked flying squirrels, he knew that they could damage house wiring and that dealing with this problem would involve dangerous climbing and specialized wildlife control techniques. Mr. Browning lives in a…
Jan 26
How We Get Squirrels Out of Your Home
26 Jan, 2016. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
“Squirrel in the attic” is one of the most common calls that we receive in the Bristol/Johnson City TN area. Customers who call us have often experienced problems that come with these fuzzy invaders.   Chewed wiring, chewed woodwork, accumulated feces, and carcasses of deceased animals are commonly found in homes infested by squirrels. If the invasion has been long standing, these problems will be severe. We often see evidence of failed attempts to solve the problem when we reach the client’s home.   Sometimes, box traps are set inside attics or outside homes.   Customers sometimes catch an offending animal which is…
Jun 2
Raccoons in your home!
2 Jun, 2015. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
“Raccoon in the attic” is one of our most common calls.   Raccoons are excellent climbers and have little problems reaching rooftops where they can then enter attics.  They may even enter crawl spaces if left open.  Having these guys in your home can wreak havoc on your home.   We had one customer who had raccoons tear about 30 holes in a flat vinyl roof while they were away on vacation.   (It also rained while they were gone.)  We thought that it might be helpful if people knew a few of the signs to look for if they…
Apr 17
10 Signs to Look For to Know if You Have Raccoons Living in Your home
17 Apr, 2015. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
“Raccoon in the attic” is one of our most common calls. Raccoons are excellent climbers and have little problems reaching rooftops where they can then enter attics. They may even enter crawl spaces if left open. Having these guys in your home can wreak havoc on your home. We had one customer who had raccoons tear about 30 holes in a flat vinyl roof while they were away on vacation. (It also rained while they were gone.) We thought that it might be helpful if people knew a few of the signs to look for if they think they have…
Jan 11
Bristol Coyotes
11 Jan, 2015. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
WGI_0087 Coyotes in Bristol Local coyote populations have been brought to my attention when we received several calls from local residents who were concerned about recent coyote sightings. These calls ranged from the Virginia High School area to the Tri Cities Airport area.   Our own wildlife monitoring camera has shown footage of coyotes near Steeles Creek Park. Coyotes range widely and are undoubtedly present through our entire region. A coyote sighting even made the news in our region. A news article run on October 20th of 2013 by WCYB (http://www.wcyb.com/news/coyotes-sighted-in-bristol-womens-front-yard/22535646) described a coyote sighting by Karen Orfield who lives off…
Nov 24
Shrew Having breakfast
24 Nov, 2014. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
Shrews have a voracious appetite.  They can eat up to three times their body weight per day.  Watch this little guy eat an earth worm that is as long as his body. MVI_1059
Nov 24
Glow in the Dark Traking Powder and Rats
24 Nov, 2014. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
History of Rats and Humans Rats are highly associated with humans and can be prolific, especially when ample food is available.  They foul foods with urine and feces, chew wiring, and chew holes in our homes.  Because of this, humanity has probably been trying to kill them ever since they first moved in with us thousands of years ago.    Our mutual history includes an estimated 75-200 million dead from the Black Death .   A variety of other potentially fatal diseases are also spread by rats .   Combined, mice and rats carry 35 different diseases that can be transmitted to humans.  The term "dirty rat"…
Nov 18
Short Tailed Shrew: The Smelly Rodent
18 Nov, 2014. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
This critter is the Short Tailed shrew.   It's fur is gray with a texture like velvet.  The eyes are very small, and are almost unnoticeable.   It's incisors are dark brown (look closely in the pictures below).   Presumably,  the iron deposits that darken the teeth also help harden them.  This is helpful considering that their teeth are not continually growing like those in mice.   Their bite is toxic and can subdue an animal larger than the shrew itself.  In fact, they are the only venomous mammal MVI_1059 They are primarily insectivorous, but occasionally feeds on grain.  They can consume up to three…
Nov 9
Save a beaver and save our streams!
9 Nov, 2014. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
Beavers: Prominent Players in American History Prior to the appearance of Europeans,  beavers in North America are estimated to have numbered between 60 and 400 million.  Then, beavers were an important to local Indians who found them to be an important source of food, tools, medicine, and clothing.  Examinations of primitive camp sites show that only the remains of White Tail Deer outnumber those of Beaver.    By the early 1800's the beaver top hat was all the rage and pelts were in high demand in Europe.  This demand helped drive the development and colonization of early America and sealed the fate for beavers in many parts of what is now…
Oct 21
Pootie on the Wall and Five Other Clues That You May Have Bats in Your Home
21 Oct, 2014. 0 Comments. . Posted By: Pat Galliher
I just saw a bat! Hey, there is another! I wonder if we have them living in the house?  How do I know if I do? Our local bat species  are relatively small, almost like mice with wings.  They can pass through very small openings; and they prefer to enter buildings at points that are very high off the ground.   Few, if any other species are likely to leave this type of "calling card".   This dropping is a little larger than a grain of rice and is attached to the outside of a brick wall.  This usually happens as the bats are coming in for a landing. …